Join Now!      Login

Whole Person Wellness Program
 
healthy.net Wellness Model
Skip Navigation Links
 
 
FREE NEWSLETTER
   
   
   
 
Health Centers
Key Services
 
Breast Cancer?
More than three-quarters of women who get breast cancer are over whtat age?
over 40 years
over 45 years
over 50 years
over 55 years

 
 

 Research Identifies Protein In Mice That Regulates Bone Formation 
 
by Harvard School of Public Health - 6/22/2006
Boston, MA -- Osteoporosis, a disease characterized by a decrease in bone mass and density and which makes people more susceptible to bone fractures and deformities, afflicts some 10 million Americans over the age of 50. Researchers at the Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) have discovered that eliminating a protein, Schnurri-3 (Shn3), in mice led to profound increases in bone mass throughout their skeletal system. The results may have implications for the treatment of osteoporosis. The study was published in the May 26 edition of Science (http://www.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/abstract/312/5777/1223).

Osteoporosis has serious health consequences. One-fifth of patients with osteoporosis who fracture their hips will die within a year. As the baby boomer generation gets older, it is predicted that the number of hip fractures may triple by 2020 unless better prevention and treatment for the disease is improved.

The researchers, led by Dallas Jones, a research associate in the Department of Immunology and Infectious Diseases, Marc Wein, an MD, PhD student, and senior author Laurie Glimcher, Professor of Immunology, observed that augmented osteoblast activity, rather than impaired osteoclast activity, was responsible for the elevated bone mass. Osteoblasts are cells that form new bone. Jones, Wein and their colleagues found that Shn3 formed a complex with a protein known as WWP1; together, the pair degrades Runx2, a transcription factor that is the master regulator of osteoblast differentiation, which activates key bone formation genes. By removing Shn3 or WWP1, Runx2 doesn’t degrade, which leads to increased bone mass.

The authors believe that targeting Shn3 and WWP1 for drug discovery is an exciting prospect. Glimcher's lab has forged a collaboration with Brandeis University biochemist Greg Petsko to find compounds that inhibit the two proteins, which could lead to new and better treatments for osteoporosis. Though the biggest hurdles of drug discovery lie in the distant future, said Petsko, “as early stage targets go, this looks promising. It just smells like a good target.”

The study was supported by NIH grants, a grant from the Peabody Foundation, post-doctoral fellowships from the Arthritis Foundation and the Irvington Institute, and by the Medical Scientist Training Program at Harvard Medical School.

   
Provided by Harvard School of Public Health on 6/22/2006
 
 From Our Friends
 
 
 
Popular & Related Products
 
Popular & Featured Events
Wellness Inventory Certification Training
     September 16-December 16, 2014
     Teleclass, CA USA
 
Additional Calendar Links
 
Stevia Products & Info
 
Dimensions of Wellness
Wellness, Breathing, dimension!

Home       Wellness       Health A-Z       Alternative Therapies       Find a Practitioner       Healthy Products       Bookstore       Wellness Inventory
Healthy Kitchen       Healthy Woman       Healthy Man       Healthy Child       Healthy Aging       Wellness Center       Nutrition Center       Fitness Center
Free Newsletter      What Doctor's Don't Tell You      Stevia.com      Discount Lab Tests      First Aid      Global Health Calendar      Privacy Policy     Contact Us
Disclaimer: The information provided on HealthWorld Online is for educational purposes only and IS NOT intended as a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek professional medical advice from your physician or other qualified healthcare provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition.
Are you ready to embark on a personal wellness journey with our whole person approach?
Learn More/Subscribe
Are you looking to create or enhance a culture of wellness in your organization?
Learn More
Do you want to become a wellness coach?
Learn More
Free Webinar