Join Now!      Login

Whole Person Wellness Program
 
healthy.net Wellness Model
Skip Navigation Links
 
 
FREE NEWSLETTER
   
   
   
 
Health Centers
Key Services
 
Walking?
Which of the following in NOT a direct benefit of a regular walking regimen?
Reduce Stress
Improved immune function
Achieving ideal weight.
Improved sugar metabolism

 
 
 What Doctors Don't Tell You: NUTRITIONAL CURES FOR DEMENTIA 
 
What Doctors Don't Tell You © (Volume 5, Issue 12)
WDDTY panelist Dr Melvyn Werbach believes that up to a fifth of all dementia in the elderly is reversible, and one large cause is malnutrition or malabsorption, or an inadequate amount of a number of nutrients. He and other nutritional specialists suggest that anyone with symptoms suggestive of Alzheimer's should:

Have your toxic metal levels tested and, if high, get them removed following the correct protocol for removal and detoxification (see WDDTY Dental Handbook).Eat a varied diet of unrefined whole foods, rich in fresh fruits and vegetables and essential fatty acids, and low in saturated fats. Also get tested for adequate stomach acid and absorption.

Have your doctor check you out for folic acid deficiencies. Low levels of folic acid can cause poor concentration, memory failure and disorientation. Dr Werbach knows of at least one case of a woman whose severe dementia was reversed by folic acid supplementation.

Get a full medical work-up with laboratory tests to rule out nutritional deficiencies.

See if you need niacin (B3) supplementation. Dementia is a classic symptom of niacin deficiency. Dementia caused by deficiency of this nutrient can even be reversed, says Dr Werbach, if niacin levels are normalized.

In AD, enzymes in the brain that are dependent on thiamine may be reduced. Supplementation can prevent further deterioration.

Consider vitamin B12 injections. B12 deficiency is long associated with confusion, memory impairment and other neurological problems. Although a recent study concludes that AD victims had no obvious B12 deficiency, other studies show that supplementation with B12 can be effective even in patients with normal apparent B12 levels and no symptoms of deficiency. This may be either because the tests are inadequate or that absorption in the brain is somehow inadequate. In one 73-year-old woman with beginning AD symptoms but no signs or symptoms of B12 deficiency, intermuscular injections cleared all AD symptoms in three months.

Investigate possible zinc deficiency, which can cause a loss of nerve cells in the brain.

In several double-blind trials the herb ginkgo biloba increased blood flow to the brain and improved brain waves, helping people with dementia to think more clearly.

In preliminary studies, the amino acid tryptophan and the cholinergic nutrients such as phosphatidyl choline have shown some preliminary encouraging results, but longer trials are necessary.

 Comments Add your comment 

 About The Author
What Doctors Don't Tell You What Doctors Don’t Tell You is one of the few publications in the world that can justifiably claim to solve people's health problems - and even save lives. Our monthly newsletter gives you the facts you won't......more
 
 From Our Friends
 
 
 
Popular & Related Products
 
Popular & Featured Events
Wellness Inventory Certification Training
     September 16-December 16, 2014
     Teleclass, CA USA
 
Additional Calendar Links
 
Stevia Products & Info
 
Dimensions of Wellness
Wellness, Transcending, dimension!

Home       Wellness       Health A-Z       Alternative Therapies       Find a Practitioner       Healthy Products       Bookstore       Wellness Inventory
Healthy Kitchen       Healthy Woman       Healthy Man       Healthy Child       Healthy Aging       Wellness Center       Nutrition Center       Fitness Center
Free Newsletter      What Doctor's Don't Tell You      Stevia.com      Discount Lab Tests      First Aid      Global Health Calendar      Privacy Policy     Contact Us
Disclaimer: The information provided on HealthWorld Online is for educational purposes only and IS NOT intended as a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek professional medical advice from your physician or other qualified healthcare provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition.
Are you ready to embark on a personal wellness journey with our whole person approach?
Learn More/Subscribe
Are you looking to create or enhance a culture of wellness in your organization?
Learn More
Do you want to become a wellness coach?
Learn More
Free Webinar