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ealthy Computing Tips
 


Healthy Computing: Working Postures

© Erik Peper PhD

The following is one in an ongoing series of columns entitled Healthy Computing Tips by Erik Peper PhD. View all columns in series
When working in an office, we usually accept the ergonomic situation as it is. We often adapt our bodies to the environment and thereby create dysfunctional working postures. Decrease your risk and enhance your health when you check and then change your working postures.

How to Check Your Working Postures
Use the following checklist, Working Postures*. To any question that you answered with NO, explore strategies to reduce the risk of injury.

The workstation is designed or arranged for doing computer tasks so it allows your

  1. Head and neck to be upright, or in-line with the torso (not bent down/back).
  2. Head, neck, and trunk to face forward (not twisted).
  3. Trunk to be perpendicular to floor (may lean back into backrest but not forward).
  4. Shoulders and upper arms to be in-line with the torso, generally about perpendicular to the floor and relaxed (not elevated or stretched forward).
  5. Upper arms and elbows to be close to the body (not extended outward).
  6. Forearms, wrists, and hands to be straight and in-line (forearm at about 90 degrees to the upper arm).
  7. Wrists and hands to be straight (not bent up/down or sideways toward the little finger).
  8. Thighs to be parallel to the floor and the lower legs to be perpendicular to floor (thighs may be slightly elevated above knees).
  9. Feet rest flat on the floor or are supported by a stable footrest.

* from Computer Workstation Check List developed by OSHA. For more detail

Copyright 2003 Erik Peper, Ph.D. and Katherine Hughes Gibney
Permission to copy and distribute Healthy Computing Email Tips for personal use is granted. Distribution or copying of Healthy Computing Email Tips for commercial purposes is prohibited without prior written consent of the copyright holders

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About The Author
Erik Peper, Ph.D. is an international authority on biofeedback and self-regulation. He is Professor and Co-Director of the Institute for Holistic Healing Studies, Department of Health Education, at San Francisco State University. He is President of the Biofeedback Foundation of Europe (2005) and past President of the Association for Applied Psychophysiology and Biofeedback.......more
 
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Disclaimer: The information provided on HealthWorld Online is for educational purposes only and IS NOT intended as a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek professional medical advice from your physician or other qualified healthcare provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition.