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© Leon Chaitow ND, DO, MRO

* Cooking or salad oils include corn olive, peanut, safflower, sunflower, soya, sesame, liquid vegetable margarine.

Note: Oils and fats from avocado, corn, safflower, soyabean, sunflower or from nuts, are polyunsaturated (more desirable than saturated). Oil from olives/olive oil is mono unsaturated (also considered desirable).

Fruit
Each Fruit exchange unit provides 40 calories and contains no fat and minimal protein. Each EU also provides 2 grams of dietary fiber, essential for good intestinal health.

Product Fruit EU
1 medium apple (3OZ)
1
1 large apple
2
2 apricots
1
1 banana
2
0.5 cup raspberries or blackberries
1
0.75 cup strawberries
1
10 large cherries
1
10 seedless grapes
1
1 grapefruit
2
1 orange or tangerine
1
1 mango
4
1 melon (honeydew)
10
1 melon (cantaloupe)
4
1 nectarine
2
1 papaya (medium)
2
2 passion fruits
1
1 medium pear
1
1 large pear
2
1 peach
1
1 cup of pineapple
2
2 plums
1
1 pomegranate
2
2 prunes
1
2 dates
1
l fig (dried or fresh)
1
4 dried apricots
1
2 tablespoons raisins
1
1 large slice watermelon
1
0.5 cup lemon juice
1
1 cup unsweetened apple juice
3
1 cup grapefruit juice
2
1 cup grape juice
4
1 cup orange juice
2
1 cup pineapple juice
3
1 cup prune juice
4
1 tablespoon blackstrap molasses
1

Grains/Starch
Each exchange unit of Grain/Starch contains 2 grams of protein and provides 70 calories. Some of these foods also contain Fat EUs which are listed below, and up to 15 grams of fiber are found in each Grain/Starch EU. Some starchy vegetables appear on this exchange list instead of in the Vegetable category (and can therefore only be exchanged with foods on THIS list).

Product Grain/
Starch EU
Fat
EU
1 slice shop-bought bread (most types)
1
1 slice homemade bread (most types)
1
1 slice cornbread
1
1
1 bread roll
1
1 cup dried breadcrumbs
2
1 Danish pastry
2
3
1 pancake
1
0.5
1 biscuit (two inches in diameter)
1
1
3 rye bread wafers
1
1 oatmeal biscuit*
1
0.5
1 Matzos wafer
2
1 cup bran flakes (non sugared)
2
0.75 cup other unsweetened cereal flakes
1
1 cup puffed cereal (unsweetened)
1
1 cup COOKED cereal (oats etc.)
2
1 cup COOKED rice or pasta
2
16oz raw rice (which makes 6 cups of cooked rice)
6
160z raw spaghetti makes 10.5 cups when cooked
21
160z raw macaroni makes 9 cups when cooked
18
160z raw noodles makes 9 cups when cooked
18
3 cupsful popcorn (no butter)
1
0.25 cup wheat or corn flour (dry)
1
1 small corn on cob
1
1 cup corn
3
1 cup lima beans
2
2/3 cup of parsnips
1
1 cup green peas (fresh, frozen or tinned)
2
1 small potato
1
1 cup mashed potato (no butter)
2
1 cup sweet potato
4
1 cup squash (marrow)
2
0.75 cup pumpkin
1
1 large can (10.50z) mushroom soup
1
1.5
1 large can (10.50z) tomato soup
1
0.5
* Also contains undesirable sugar content.

High protein
Each High Protein exchange unit contains 7 grams of protein; most contain around 3 grams of fat (some contain none) and provides 55 calories. Where even higher fat content exists (e.g. goose) this will be made clear. Animal proteins as listed provide no fiber, whereas vegetable proteins provide around 8 grams of fiber per EU: important for bowel function. All meat listed is assumed to be cooked. Vegetable High Protein alternatives to meat/fish MUST always be combined at the same meal with grains or seeds to provide first class protein. This category also lists some dairy products such as cheese and eggs.

Product High
Protein
EU
Fat
EU
Grain/
Starch EU
loz of any of the following trimmed of all visible fat:
Beef liver, sirloin steak, T-bone steak, Porterhouse steak, veal cutlets, veal steaks
1
0.5
loz pork loin or rump (ham), lamb chop or liver or roast
1
0.5
loz of chicken, turkey or game birds (all skin removed from all these)
1
1 large egg
1
0.5
2 egg whites
1
loz of fresh fish or 0.25 cup tinned fish or seafood
1
0.5 cup (low fat) cottage cheese
2
loz processed cheese
1
loz mozzarella, ricotta, Parmesan or neuchatel cheese
1
0.5
0.5 cup regular cottage cheese
2
0.5
loz of any of the following medium to high fat meats such as:
Loin steak, corned beef, stewing beef, fried beef liver, boiled ham, pig's liver
1
1
loz of the following high fat meats such as:
Commercial hamburger, ground beef stewing veal, veal breast, spare ribs (pork), salami, lamb chops, deviled ham, cold cuts of meat
1
1.5
loz of any poultry with skin
1
1.5
loz of goose
1
1.5
loz cheddar, roquefort, blue Swiss or American processed cheese
1
1
Vegetable proteins:
1 cup cooked soyabeans
3
1.5
1.5
3.5oz tofu (beancurd)
1
0.5
2 tablespoons peanut butter
1
2
1 cup cooked dried beans (any)
2
2
1 cup cooked lentils
2
2
1 cup cooked dried peas (or split peas)
2
2
1 cup shelled walnuts
2
13
1
1 cup shelled peanuts
5
14
2
1 cup shelled almonds
3.5
14
1.5

Vegetables
Each Vegetable exchange unit contains 2 grams of protein and provides 25 calories. Each EU also provides 2 grams of dietary fiber, essential for good intestinal health. Some vegetables which are particularly starchy (potatoes for example) are listed in the Grain/Starch category.

Important note: Some vegetables, because of their extremely low calorie content can be eaten in unlimited quantities, and these are: chicory, endive, lettuce, radishes, Chinese leaves, parsley, watercress.

All of the following constitute 1 EU as 1 cup of raw vegetable or 0.5 cup of cooked vegetable: artichoke, asparagus, aubergine, bean sprouts, beet root, broccoli, Brussels sprouts, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, celery, chard, courgettes, cucumber, dandelion greens, green pepper, kales, mushrooms, mustard greens, onion, spinach, string beans, tomatoes, turnips and turnip greens, water chestnuts.

The following all represent 1 Vegetable EU each:

    1 x 20z carrot
    3 celery sticks
    1 cucumber
    4 medium-sized spring onions
    1 green pepper
    1 tomato

1 Vegetable EU is represented by each of the following additional vegetable products:

    1 cup of bamboo shoots (tinned)
    1 tablespoon dehydrated onion flakes
    Half a sweet pickled cucumber
    A quarter of a tin of condensed tomato soup (which also contains 0.5 Fat EU and 0.5 Bread EU)

Refer back to Chapter 4 in which the benefits of a raw food diet were explained in detail so that you are well aware of the potential value of vegetables in your diet. In Chapter 13 there is more on raw foods, most notably salads and fruits. Try not to lose sight of the advantage, on your restriction diet, of being able to add almost unlimited amounts of salad vegetables (chicory, lettuce, watercress, parsley etc.) to the diet owing to their almost total lack of calorie value.

Liquids
The more fruit and salad eaten the less need there is for drinking fluids (your thirst will be less anyway). However, as a general guide it is suggested that not less than 3 pints of water or its equivalent be consumed daily. This works out at about six tumblers.

Obsession
Remember, too, that it is most unwise to become obsessive about application of every fine detail of this dietary approach. Just as long as you are getting fairly close to your calorie, protein and fat requirements most of the time, there is no call for anxiety. Even if you go right off the rails periodically, owing to circumstances outside your control (travel and social obligations might make consistency difficult), or for reasons of your own choice (parties or family gatherings, for example), you should not feel concerned or guilty. The overall pattern which you adopt will be the one that has the effect, and this will be little disturbed by periodic breaking of rules, which you are setting for yourself and are therefore entitled to alter as you wish.

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About The Author
A practicing naturopath, osteopath, and acupuncturist in the United Kingdom, with over forty years clinical experience, Chaitow is Editor-in-Chief, of the Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies. He regularly lectures in the United States as well as Europe where he instructs......more
 
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Disclaimer: The information provided on HealthWorld Online is for educational purposes only and IS NOT intended as a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek professional medical advice from your physician or other qualified healthcare provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition.