Skip Navigation Links
 



                     


 



   
    Learn More     Subscribe    
Join Now!      Login
 
 
 
FREE HEALTH
NEWSLETTER
 
 
Stevia Poll
Have you ever used Stevia as a sweetener?
 
 
 
 
H
ealth Collections
 

Childhood Asthma

© Micaela Sullivan-Fowler


1) TITLE:
  Clinical significance of cough and wheeze in the diagnosis of asthma.
AUTHOR:
  Kelly YJ; Brabin BJ; Milligan PJ; Reid JA; Heaf D; Pearson MG
AUTHOR AFFILIATION:
  Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine, University of Liverpool.
SOURCE:
  Arch Dis Child 1996 Dec;75(6):489-93
NLM CIT. ID:
  97166911
ABSTRACT:
OBJECTIVES:
(1) To determine the prevalence of cough, wheeze, and breathlessness, both as single symptoms and in combination, in primary schoolchildren and their relation to doctor diagnosed asthma. (2) To identify in areas with different levels of dust pollution whether questionnaire reported 'cough alone' (without wheeze or breathlessness) had similar risk factors to the questionnaire reported triad of 'cough, wheeze, and breathlessness'.
SUBJECTS AND METHODS:
Two cross sectional community surveys of primary schoolchildren (5-11 years) were performed in 1991 and 1993. Parent completed questionnaires related to socioeconomic and respiratory factors were distributed through 15 schools in three areas of Merseyside, one of which had a relatively high level of dust pollution. Data were analysed to determine the prevalence of different respiratory symptom patterns. Univariate and multiple logistic regressions were used to investigate the associations between respiratory symptom profiles and potential risk factors.
RESULTS:
The proportions of completed questionnaires that were returned were similarly high in both surveys, 92% in 1991 (1872 of 2035) and 87% in 1993 (3746 of 4288). The proportions of children with different respiratory symptom patterns were similar in the two surveys: in 1991, asymptomatic children 70.1% (1109 of 1583), those with cough alone 8.9% (141 of 1583), and children with the symptom triad of cough, wheeze, and breathlessness 8.3% (132 of 1583); the figures for 1993 were 69.5% (2144 of 3083), 9.2% (284 of 3083), and 7.3% (224 of 3083) respectively. The prevalence of doctor diagnosed asthma increased from 17.4% in 1991 to 22.1% in 1993. The symptom of cough alone was associated with going to school in an area of increased air pollution. The symptom triad of cough, wheeze, and breathlessness was associated with reported allergies, familial history of atopy and preterm birth. In 1991, of children with the symptom of cough alone one in eight were diagnosed asthmatic; twice as many doctors made the diagnosis on this basis in 1993.
CONCLUSION:
The respiratory symptom of cough alone and cough, wheeze, and breathlessness represent clinical responses to different specific risk factors. Cough alone was associated with the environmental factors of school in the dust exposed zone and dampness in the home, whereas cough, wheeze, and breathlessness related to allergic history and preterm birth, and may be the best surrogate of asthma. Diagnosis of asthma on the basis of cough alone partly explains the increased prevalence of doctor diagnosed asthma, especially in dust polluted areas.


2) TITLE:
  Acute management of severe childhood asthma.
AUTHOR:
  Geller M
SOURCE:
  AACN Clin Issues 1996 Nov;7(4):519-28
NLM CIT. ID:
  97125174
ABSTRACT:
Severe childhood asthma is a serious, life-threatening disease that presents a challenge for patients, families, and caregivers. Despite evolving medical and pharmacologic therapies, the incidence and severity of asthma are increasing. Vasoactive substances are released in response to environmental and intrinsic triggers and result in bronchospasm, bronchial mucosal edema, and mucus plugging of the airways. Early recognition of symptoms and prompt, aggressive treatment, including oxygen, beta agonists, corticosteroids, and anticholinergic agents, are essential in halting the progression of asthma symptoms. In the most severe cases, intubation, mechanical ventilation, and treatment with anesthetic agents may be needed to avoid significant morbidity and mortality. This article reviews epidemiology, pathophysiology, and acute care of the child experiencing an acute asthma exacerbation.
Add your comment   CONTINUED      Previous   1  2  3  4  5  6  7  Next   
About The Author
 
Share   Facebook   Buzz   Delicious   Digg   Twitter  
 
 
 
 
 
 
From Our Sponsor
 
 
 
 
 
 
Featured Events
Wellness Inventory Certification Training - Level I
     February 18-May 20, 2014
     Los Angeles, CA USA
 
Additional Calendar Links
 
Wellness, Eating, dimension!

Search   
Home       Wellness       Health A-Z       Alternative Therapies       Find a Practitioner       Healthy Products       Bookstore       Wellness Inventory
Healthy Kitchen       Healthy Woman       Healthy Man       Healthy Child       Healthy Aging       Wellness Center       Nutrition Center       Fitness Center
Free Newsletter      What Doctor's Don't Tell You      Stevia.com      Discount Lab Tests      First Aid      Global Health Calendar      Privacy Policy     Contact Us

Disclaimer: The information provided on HealthWorld Online is for educational purposes only and IS NOT intended as a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek professional medical advice from your physician or other qualified healthcare provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition.