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Amino Acid Requirements

© Elson M. Haas MD

Protein Excess
There is definite concern that the developed countries are overconsuming protein, especially from meat and dairy foods. Since nearly 700 million people in the world are protein deficient, it seems ludicrous that Americans and people in other well-to-do countries consume so much. But we could be paying the price!

The RDA protein standards may be highly overestimated; and grams of protein daily. The World Health Organization more conservatively puts our protein needs at about half of the U.S. government minimum levels, or 0.45 grams of protein per kilogram of ideal body weight.

The Western world definitely has less deficiency disease than parts of the Third World, such as Africa, the Near and Far East, and Central and South America. But we also have far more chronic and degenerative diseases, such as arthritis, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and cancer. All of these problems have dietary correlations, some of which are shown in specific studies, but many that, in my opinion, will be discovered in future years with research into the nutritional components of disease. Eventually, through knowledge and behavior, we need to find the right balance in our diet.

Protein Deficiency
With all the worldly and space technology and the wealth of resources we possess, much of the world's population is yet impoverished and near starvation. Thousands of children and adults die daily from lack of nourishing food, and protein is of key importance. In areas where meats and milk products are not plentiful and where often only one or two food sources are available, such as rice, wheat, corn, or potatoes, people are not getting the complete balance of amino acids and protein needed to sustain the body. They go into negative nitrogen balance and begin to experience weight loss, fluid retention, weakness, hair loss, and the inability to heal wounds.

The name for protein deficiency disease is kwashiorkor, a Ghanian word for "the evil spirit that infects the child." Protein deficiency is a wasting disease that in its severe state leads to death. It is curable, of course, with consumption of complete protein foods or supplements. Marasmus, another protein deficiency disease associated with calorie or food deficiency, comes from a starvation diet and results in complete loss of energy and tissue wasting. Also called "protein-calorie malnutrition" (PCM), it is the world's most widespread and correctable malnutrition problem, killing millions yearly.

The Western world's example of protein deficiency is mirrored in the alcoholic, who obtains a large portion of his or her calorie intake from carbohydrates in the form of ethyl alcohol. Food and protein consumption may be minimal. Malnutrition and fat accumulation in the liver lead to rapidly advancing demise unless alcohol is reduced and nutrition is increased. Cirrhosis, scarring, and malnutrition of the liver is one of the top ten degenerative diseases leading to death in the United States.

Recently there has been worldwide concern over hunger, malnutrition, and starvation. It certainly seems that a primary part of our responsibility on this planet is to feed all the people adequately. After all, on an individual or family level, food, shelter, and clothing come before fancy cars, exclusive restaurants, and trips to the Caribbean. Donations to hunger projects, attending fundraising music concerts, and helping to raise money ourselves are short-term ways to feed some hungry people, but there are other approaches too. Currently, on a global level, higher precedence is given to using land for grazing meat-rendering animals than for growing grain for direct human consumption. Many acres of grain and plant proteins are used to feed a small number of cattle and still more grain is used to feed poultry. This grain could feed many more people than can the meat of dead chickens! A reduction in animal meat production and an increased emphasis on vegetable and grain foods would help feed the impoverished everywhere. Yet perhaps the most important contibution we can make towards reducing hunger and starvation in the world is by helping and teaching people to plant and harvest their own food sources.

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About The Author
Elson M. Haas, MD is founder & Director of the Preventive Medical Center of Marin (since 1984), an Integrated Health Care Facility in San Rafael, CA and author of many books on Health and Nutrition, including ...more
 
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Disclaimer: The information provided on HealthWorld Online is for educational purposes only and IS NOT intended as a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek professional medical advice from your physician or other qualified healthcare provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition.